In the News

October 31, 2018

First responders who saved lives during the deadly Montecito mudslides were honored in a special ceremony Tuesday.

The Montecito Fire Department presented the first and only valor awards in the history of the fire department to Firefighter Paramedic Andy Rupp and Wildland Fire Specialist Maeve Juarez.

October 31, 2018

Hundreds came together in Santa Barbara Tuesday night to show solidarity for the victims of the Pittsburgh synagogue shooting.

A huge crowd gathered at Congregation B’nai B’rith, joining in song and mourning for the 11 people killed in the shooting at a synagogue on Saturday.

The local clergy said they were deeply saddened by the horrific attack.

Senator Hannah-Beth Jackson and Congressman Salud Carbajal addressed the crowd about the strength in the community’s love and support.

October 12, 2018

From the Hollywood casting couch to the halls of our state Capitol, it has been a year of trauma and vindication for countless women who came forward to say, “me too.” We used our voices to heal, to help others, to seek justice, and to demand change. Now, we will soon find out if it our governor will sign real remedies into law.

October 12, 2018

The Governor has signed into law a bill from a Santa Barbara legislator intended to help people make their homes more brush fire resistant.

SB 465 allows local government agencies to expand an existing program to help homeowners make energy and water efficiency improvements to include fire proofing efforts.

The PACE program gives homeowners upfront financing for important home improvements, which are paid back through property tax bills.

October 12, 2018

California just became the first to demand that publicly traded companies put at least one woman on their boards of directors by the end 2019. Veuer's Natasha Abellard has the story.

California's new law requiring companies to include women on their boards of directors may not survive widely expected legal challenges, but it has already spotlighted the entrenched practices and barriers that have helped keep women out of boardrooms.

October 12, 2018

When Harvey Weinstein was fired a year ago this week, commentators were quick to point out that all of his board members were men. Similarly, when Leslie Moonves was forced out of CBS last month, many noted that just three of the company’s 14 directors were women.

The #MeToo movement has raised a question that often follows corporate disasters: Could this have been avoided if more women were in charge?

August 30, 2018

Citing a lack of diversity in corporate boardrooms, state lawmakers on Thursday sent the governor a bill that would require women to be included on the boards of directors of firms headquartered in California.

The bill would require that publicly held corporations headquartered in the state include at least one woman on boards of directors by the end of 2019, and at least two by July 2021. Corporate boards with six or more members would be required to have at least three women on the panels by the middle of 2021.

August 29, 2018

California state Sen. Hannah-Beth Jackson, a Democrat, says women’s insight ‘is critical to discussions and decisions that affect corporate culture, actions and profitability.’ Photo: Rich Pedroncelli/Associated Press

California legislators on Wednesday passed a bill that requires major companies based in the state to put female directors on their boards.

August 28, 2018

In the biggest move yet aimed at blocking the Trump administration’s plans to allow new offshore oil drilling off the California coast, state lawmakers have approved a bill that would ban construction of any new pipelines to get the oil to shore.

August 27, 2018

A controversial bill requiring that publicly traded California companies include women on their boards of directors heads to the Assembly floor this week.

SB826, which is opposed by many business groups, would make California the first state with such a mandate.

State Sen. Hannah-Beth Jackson, D-Santa Barbara, the bill’s author, said it’s important for businesses to have a perspective from women — and time to “blow that glass ceiling up.”

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