In the News

October 03, 2019

The findings elicited praise from state senator Hannah-Beth Jackson, D-Santa Barbara, who authored a bill that would curb gun ownership for people with repeat alcohol convictions. Senate Bill 55 is stalled in the Assembly Public Safety Committee this year but Jackson hopes to move it forward next year.

“As our nation faces an epidemic of gun violence, we must pursue data-driven policies that will help keep deadly firearms out of the hands of those most at risk of committing future violent and firearm-related crimes,” Jackson said in a prepared statement.

August 28, 2019

Arguing that some key provisions are unworkable, industry lobbyists have pushed to allow more types of data to be excluded from the law’s protections and allow more information to be sold. Meanwhile, privacy groups have sought to hold companies accountable for every violation and to give individuals the right to sue companies that run afoul of the law.

August 22, 2019

Another gun proposal that Brown vetoed has been resurrected in the Legislature. The bill, SB 55, would ban gun ownership for 10 years after three drunk driving convictions. It also would apply to anyone guilty of vehicular manslaughter while intoxicated.

Sen. Hannah-Beth Jackson (D-Santa Barbara), the bill’s author, says studies have shown that drunk drivers are five times more likely to misuse firearms than sober motorists.

“We need to take these firearms away from dangerous people,” she says.

June 27, 2019

Why a California lawmaker wants to ban cigarette filters and disposable vapes

By Rachel Becker | June 25, 2019 | ENVIRONMENT, LEGISLATURE, WATER

We’ve all seen it, the smoker who takes one last drag and flicks the cigarette butt onto the ground. It’s instant litter that California Sen. Hannah-Beth Jackson wants to prevent by banning the filters in most cigarettes.

May 22, 2019

New York Times

California Today: The Fight Over a Landmark Digital Privacy Law

By Jill Cowan

May 22, 2019

May 15, 2019

By Jasmin Tuffaha Gutierrez, Special to CALmatters

Again, researching family leave laws is not usually involved in career planning, and it was only when I moved into my current job and became pregnant that I realized that I, along with about half the entire workforce in California, don’t have family leave rights.

Our laws that give parents the right to return to their jobs only apply to those who work for larger employers, and only if they have worked for the employer at least a full year and on average over 24 hours per week.

May 13, 2019

By Lois Kazakoff May 11, 2019 Updated: May 11, 2019 11:32 a.m.

May 13, 2019

By Heidi Sanborn, Special to CALmatters

California should have a good handle on smoking-related litter. After all, the state’s residents smoke at the second-lowest rate in the U.S. after Utah.  

There already are strong and dutifully-enforced litter laws with convictions that can carry hefty four-digit fines. But a walk down any California city sidewalk or a stroll on the beach easily demonstrates that smokers still are tossing their butts on the ground.

May 09, 2019

By Jerry Roberts

Hannah-Beth Jackson alighted from the family’s all-electric Chevy Bolt, hustling to a final meeting in her district before winging off to another workweek in Sacramento. 

It was a dozy Monday morning, but Santa Barbara’s State Senator was already in fifth gear.

May 08, 2019

By Alexei Koseff May 7, 2019 Updated: May 7, 2019 7:47 p.m.

SACRAMENTO — Californians could take an additional two weeks of paid leave to care for a new baby or sick family member and could buy diapers and menstrual products tax-free under the revised budget plan that Gov. Gavin Newsom will unveil this week.

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